Dialogo è accettare l'altro come è e come egli stesso si definisce e si presenta a noi, di non cessare di essere se stessi mentre ci si confronta con il diverso, di essere consapevoli che la nostra identità esce arricchita e non sminuita da chi di questa identità non accetta alcuni elementi, magari anche quelli che noi riteniamo fondamentali. La riconciliazione è possibile, tra i cristiani e nella compagnia degli uomini. (Enzo Bianchi, priore della Comunità di Bose)


Matteo Ricci: Building bridges in Ming China

di Liu Fang

In 1577, Father Matteo Ricci was assigned to missions in the Far East. He left Italy, and after a formidable journey, finally arrived in Zhaoqing, of China's southern province of Guangdong, in 1583. There he began his lifelong mission to link the two great civilizations.

2010 marks the 400th anniversary of Ricci's death, and an exhibition was kicked off at Beijing's Capital Museum last Saturday that follows the footsteps of the great intellectual who created the first cultural bridge between China and the West.


2010 marks the 400th anniversary of Ricci's death, and an exhibition was kicked off at Beijing's Capital Museum last Saturday that follows the footsteps of the great intellectual who created the first cultural bridge between China and the West.

The first part of the exhibit reconstructs the cultural and artistic fabric of the West in Ricci's time, the years of the high Renaissance. And the second part presents the world that Matteo Ricci found in China when he arrived there and - through original documents and Chinese objects of the time - the experience of Ricci in his encounter and dialogue with the Chinese.

A selection of 200 works from leading Italian and Chinese museums are presented. On display for the first time are paintings by some of the most important Italian artists of the time, including Raphael, Titan, and Lorento Lotto. There are also tapestries, pottery, documents, and scientific instruments, which testify to the completeness and importance of the grafts of European knowledge and experience in China.

The Chinese exhibits evoke fundamental aspects of the Chinese civilization of Ricci's time: the language, writing, books, the three great religions, Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism. Also on display are the works produced by Ricci and his Chinese friends, maps and scientific instruments.

he exhibition is curated by Filippo Mignini, who was in charge of three previous exhibitions on Ricci - Macerata, Italy in 2003, Rome in 2005 and Berlin in 2005.


2010 marks the 400th anniversary of Ricci's death, and an exhibition was kicked off at Beijing's Capital Museum last Saturday that follows the footsteps of the great intellectual who created the first cultural bridge between China and the West.

Filippo Mignini, president of Matteo Ricci Ins. for Relations with the East, said, "All I want to do is to present the history. From the exhibits you may find that friendship is the keyword of Matteo Ricci's journey to China. The two worlds that until then were unacquainted with each other were put into contact by him and recognized each other in his works as the two halves of a whole. It was he who found the common ground of the two civilizations and brought about understanding."

The results of Ricci's work in China were enormously significant. He was the very first person to win the trust of the Chinese and make them curious about the western world. In terms of its effectiveness and duration, this was an event of incalculable importance, and by itself justified the eternal gratitude of China to its Li Madou, the transliteration of the name "Matteo Ricci" in Chinese.

Filippo Mignini said, "The three great religions of that time were Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism. Ricci focused on studying Confucianism because he thought it was all about the things that did not exist on the earth. His unremitting efforts were expressed by the Chinese, in the absolutely unusual titled conferred to him, Xitai, meaning "master of the Far West"."

This year is not only the fourth centenary of the death of Father Matteo Ricci, but also the 40th anniversary of diplomatic relationships between China and Italy. Italian Ambassdaor to China Riccardo Sessa says the exhibition is important to both countries.

In 1610, the great pioneer died in Beijing after a brief illness. For the first time in the history of China, Emperor Wanli granted a plot of land for the burial of a foreigner.

The exhibition will run in Beijing until March the 20th, and then travels to Shanghai and Nanjing.


2010 marks the 400th anniversary of Ricci's death, and an exhibition was kicked off at Beijing's Capital Museum last Saturday that follows the footsteps of the great intellectual who created the first cultural bridge between China and the West.

Fonte:

cctv.com

9 febbraio 2010